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Dealing with Product Uncertainties in a Supply Chain

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Paper

Aligning supply chain strategies with product uncertainties
Year: 
2003

The article “Aligning Supply Chain Strategies with Product Uncertainties” by Hau L. Lee is a good starting point for SCRM, since it combines a simple, business ready framework for two major supply chain risks.Furthermore it includes many examples to reinforce the theoretical framework.

Misunderstandings and Learnings from Case Study Research

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Paper

Five Misunderstandings About Case-Study Research
Year: 
2006

Case study’s can give valuable insights for the researcher, but there are many preconceptions about this research methodology, like being too subjective or having a too small sample size to deduce any relevant information.This is also how Flyvbjerg (2006) starts his paper on the “Five Misunderstandings About Case-Study Research“.
He therefore claims the following misunderstandings:

    Negotiation Strategies in Supply Chain Management

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    Paper

    Negotiation strategies in supply chain management
    Year: 
    2008

    Within a supply chain many supplier-buyer relationships exist. Even though supply chain management aims to take a high level view, these dyadic relationships form the basis of the supply chain and therefore should be the focus of a supply chain analysis.

    The negotiation of the terms of these relationships defines the structure of the supply chain and can affect the power and profit distribution within the supply chain itself.

    So, this week we’ll have a closer look at negotiations in the supply chain using a 2008 paper by Frederik Zachariassen.

    Measuring the Bullwhip Effect in Supply Chains

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    Paper

    Measuring the bullwhip effect in the supply chain
    Year: 
    1997

    The bullwhip effect in supply chains has been around for some time now. The term “bullwhip effect” originated at Procter & Gamble, and is defined as: demand amplification across echelons within a supply chain. This describes the effect that end customer demand may be very static (as for “Pampers” by Procter & Gamble), but the demand experienced by the manufacturer or supplier shows amplified demand variations. (Fransoo and Wouters (2000))

    Matching Product Architecture with Supply Chain Design

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    Paper

    Matching Product Architecture with Supply Chain Design
    Year: 
    2011

    This review is about a preprint article which already has been accepted for publication by the “European Journal of Operational Research”. But since there is only a limited space for articles in each issue of the journal, final publication of the article is delayed.

    Mitigation or Contingency Strategies against Disruptions

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    Paper

    On the Value of Mitigation and Contingency Strategies for Managing Supply Chain Disruption Risks
    Year: 
    2006

    Uncertainty can be categorized in continuous risk, more slowly changing patterns, and disruptions, which describe abrupt changes in a system.

    Tomlin (2006) investigates the question which supply chain strategies perform best when dealing with the later.

    Mitigation vs. Contingency Planning

    From case studies analyzed in literature the author first deducts disruption management strategies used in practices. The summary can be seen in figure 1.

    Discovering the Right Planning Approach for your Supply Chain

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    Paper

    Selecting the right planning approach for a product
    Year: 
    2007

    Some weeks ago I wrote about Fisher’s suggestions on how to select the right supply chain for your product. But how to continue from there? How do different products affect the further planning steps needed?

    Multi-level Supply Chain Design

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    Paper

    Supply chain design and multilevel planning - An industrial case
    Year: 
    2008

    The quantification of supply chain planning is the next step in the field of supply chain optimization. After operational and logistical aspects have been modeled and optimized, margins for further improvement remain slim.
    Based on this premise the paper I review today suggests and tests several alternative multilevel planning approaches to gain further supply chain improvements by optimizing the mid-term supply chain design.


    h5. Case

    Identifying important Activities within the SCOR Processes

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    Paper

    Linking SCOR planning practices to supply chain performance: An exploratory study
    Year: 
    2004

    The Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model has been developed by the Supply Chain Council to provide a best-practice framework for supply chain management practices and processes with the goal to increase performance.

    SCOR

    The SCOR model consists of five major process categories: Plan, Source, Make, Deliver and Return

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