Archive for July 2011

Product design and Inventories - This Week in Supply Chain Management (30 / 2011)

Even though I read a lot of news this week, there wasn’t much supply chain related. But on the bright side this week has brought several great blog posts that I like to share with you.

Simulation as a Tool for Supply Chain Optimization

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Paper

Simulation performance in the optimisation of the supply chain
Year: 
2005

Sometimes I am really amazed by the research topics of others. Even though I already read much about simulation and its potential benefits, up to now I have never seen a analysis of supply chain simulation performance on a larger sample. So I would like to share those insights here.

Simplified Supply Chain Flows

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Paper

Simplified material flow holds the key to supply chain integration

I have to distract myself a little bit from thinking about supply chain risks too much, so I thought why not use the chance to read a different article once in a while. Well, at least the authors are familiar: Paul Childerhouse and Denis R. Towill and their paper of 2003: “Simplified material flow holds the key to supply chain integration”

Aerospace and Supplier Risks - This Week in Supply Chain Management (29 / 2011)

The second week in Thailand, and I am spending the weekend in Chiang Mai in the north. I hope you had a great week, this is what I read this week.

Combination of Product and Supply Chain Design

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Paper

An optimization model for selecting a product family and designing its supply chain

In research the decisions on the product and the corresponding supply chain are usually separated. This happens for a variety of reasons, one may be the reduction of problem complexity, another that the research focus is on a brown field approach where the products are seen as given.

This makes this article even more interesting, since it combines the both decisions in one conceptual process and a model to optimize the decision.

Recurrent versus Disruption Risk

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Paper

The importance of decoupling recurrent and disruption risks in a supply chain
Year: 
2007

The distinction between disruptions and recurrent / continuous risks is commonly used by researchers and practitioners in supply chain management. But how should the differences be reflected in the supply chain planning process? Is it necessary to differentiate between the risk types here as well?

In 2007 Sunil Chopra et al. analyzed this question in depth.

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